Justin Gatlin (left) wins the men's 100 in Lausanne over Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers // photo Getty Images

Justin Gatlin (left) wins the men's 100 in Lausanne over Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers // photo Getty Images

Track and field

Not just three dopers — at least four!

Do you believe in redemption, and the power of second chances? Or was what went down Thursday in Lausanne, Switzerland, just the saddest of all possible advertisements for track and field?

Three dopers, all American, went 1-2-3 Thursday in the sport’s glamor event, the men’s 100 meters, at the Lausanne Diamond League event: Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers.

LaShawn Merritt, left, after winning the men's 4x400 relay, holding off Michael Mathieu // photo Getty Images

LaShawn Merritt, left, after winning the men's 4x400 relay, holding off Michael Mathieu // photo Getty Images

Track and field

Bahamas rocks, U.S. rolls

NASSAU, Bahamas — The crowd was loud for the local boys’ 4×400 race. That was with Thomas A. Robinson Stadium not even maybe one-quarter full. With 19 people in line downstairs for the Kings of Jerk chicken ($10) and pork ($12), it would be more than an hour until the pros took to the blue Mondo track, two more after after that until the Bahamas Golden Knights, with three of the four guys who won Olympic gold in London two years ago in the 4×4, lining it up.

Then the place all but erupted.

14th IAAF World Athletics Championships Moscow 2013 - Day Nine

Track and field

To quote Lenin, what is to be done?

It is good to be the king, and it is good — unless and until there is evidence of doping, which it must be said could be tomorrow and could be never — to be Usain Bolt.

Because when you are Usain Bolt, you win, and when you win, you celebrate like he did Sunday at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, after yet another dominating performance by the Jamaican 4×100 men’s relay team to close out the 2013 track and field world championships.

IAAF Centenary Gala Show

Doping

On the WADA presidency

MOSCOW — Consider what just these few weeks have brought:

A massive scandal in Turkey, with revelations of teenagers being doped. A rash of doping cases in Russia. Allegations that West Germany’s government tolerated and covered up a culture of doping among its athletes for decades, and even encouraged it in the 1970s “under the guise of basic research.”