Voting in Venice Beach. This is California // Getty Images

Voting in Venice Beach. This is California // Getty Images

2024 Bid Cities

The Olympics and President-elect Donald J. Trump

A Romanian friend and I were talking the other day about the campaign for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

If Paris wins, he said, it will be a thoroughly French Olympics. But if it’s Los Angeles — that, he said, would be an international Games with the potential to prove truly transformational for the Olympic movement in the 21st century.

Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago kisses Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi's hand at Euro 2020 event, Malago saying, "I always do that with people I don't know that well" // Getty Images

Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago kisses Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi's hand at Euro 2020 event, Malago saying, "I always do that with people I don't know that well" // Getty Images

2024 Bid Cities

Rome 2024: it’s about time

Maybe corruption is everywhere within and around the Olympic movement. Or maybe not. Maybe an Olympic Games is a financial boondoggle. Or maybe not.

The International Olympic Committee needs to better understand — and then confront — the perception, widely held around the world and particularly in its longstanding base in Europe, that the movement stands not for inspiration but distress. This is a huge problem. This problem is now playing out in the campaign for the 2024 Summer Games. Real life has revealed Agenda 2020, the IOC’s 2014 would-be reform program, for what it always was, mostly lip service. The institution needs big changes in the way in which it selects cities to stage the Games, in particular its franchise, the Summer Olympics.

Gold medalist Carmelo Anthony celebrates with the crowd after the U.S. men's 96-66 victory over Serbia //  Getty Images

Gold medalist Carmelo Anthony celebrates with the crowd after the U.S. men's 96-66 victory over Serbia // Getty Images

Rio 2016

‘Iconic’ or not, Rio sighs to close

RIO de JANEIRO — Imperfect for sure, like life itself, the Rio 2016 Summer Games sighed Sunday to a close, an Olympics likely to go down in history for first-rate sport that offered a break from a welter of financial, logistical and political challenges or perhaps served merely to underscore just how difficult it is, now, to put on an Olympic Games.

For every Michael Phelps, there was the story of green water in the diving pool. For every Usain Bolt, there was the stray bullet that pierced the tent at the equestrian center. For every Simone Biles, there were the winds that ripped an overhead television camera from its cable at Olympic Park, injuring seven people, two of them children.

The 'crowd' in the stadium with just the women's 200 semifinals, women's 1500 final and men's 110 hurdle final to go

The 'crowd' in the stadium with just the women's 200 semifinals, women's 1500 final and men's 110 hurdle final to go

Track and field

Rio 2016 track meet: world-class buzzkill

RIO de JANEIRO — In a shining example of why track and field has such problems, many of the sport’s own making, the men’s 200m prelims got underway Tuesday afternoon — before a nearly-empty house — with its biggest star, Usain Bolt, running at 12:46 p.m. in the ninth of 10 heats. Justin Gatlin ran about a half-hour before, four heats prior.

Under what theory of marketing, salesmanship, promotion — more, relevance — are the No. 1 and No. 2 names in track and field slogging it out in the dog day afternoon?