Brianna Rollins, left, and Kristi Castlin in the instant after crossing the line in the 100 hurdles final at Hayward Field // Getty Images

Brianna Rollins, left, and Kristi Castlin in the instant after crossing the line in the 100 hurdles final at Hayward Field // Getty Images

Track and field

Speaking up about what is so obviously right

EUGENE — The women’s 100 hurdles here Friday at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Track Trials proved one of those rare sports events that truly lived up to expectations. It was the race of the meet: Brianna Rollins winning in 12.34 seconds, the second-fastest Trials final ever.

The second- through seventh-place finishers made for the fastest finishes for place in Trials history. Kristi Castlin took second, in 12.5, Nia Ali — just 14 months after giving birth to a son, Titus — 12.55.

Sharapova on May 24 in Chicago at the 'Sugarpova' chocolate launch // Getty Images

Sharapova on May 24 in Chicago at the 'Sugarpova' chocolate launch // Getty Images

Doping

Maria Sharapova, common sense and “intent”

It verges on the comical to read Maria Sharapova’s indignant assertion, after she was tagged by an anti-doping panel Wednesday for two years for meldonium, that the decision is, in her words, “unfairly harsh,” and that she intends to appeal to sport’s top tribunal, the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Have at it. Indeed, it’s way more likely that the relevant authorities are going to want to appeal because, in a passage that surprisingly has drawn little attention in the avalanche of stories about Wednesday’s decision, the ruling threatens to blow a barn door-sized hole in the rules as they not only were meant to be but have to be in order to have any chance at working.

A gas mask-wearing runner at Sunday's Beijing Marathon // photo Getty Images

A gas mask-wearing runner at Sunday's Beijing Marathon // photo Getty Images

IOC

Time for IOC leadership, not lip service

Friendship, excellence and respect — these are the key values underpinning the mission of the International Olympic Committee, indeed the Olympic enterprise worldwide. Moreover, the IOC likes to say that athletes are at the center of everything everyone in the Olympic movement does.

Two episodes over the weekend raise serious questions about whether both are true, or just so much lip service. And with the IOC’s policy-making executive board meeting later this week in Switzerland, the issue becomes what — if anything — the IOC is going to do about it.

Uncategorized

USOC’s Probst: “We do want to bid …”

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — The glow from the London Games still fresh in the minds of everyone in the audience, the chairman of the U.S. Olympic Committee’s board got right to the question on everyone’s minds right away.

“Make no mistake,” Larry Probst told the USOC’s annual assembly here at the Antlers Hilton Hotel, “we do want to bid, and we do want to win.