At the Eugene 2019 news conference: (left to right) IAAF general secretary Essar Gabriel; TrackTown USA president Vin Lananna;  IAAF vice president and evaluation commission chief Sebastian Coe; USA Track & Field chief executive Max Siegel; IAAF deputy general secretary and communications director Nick Davies

At the Eugene 2019 news conference: (left to right) IAAF general secretary Essar Gabriel; TrackTown USA president Vin Lananna; IAAF vice president and evaluation commission chief Sebastian Coe; USA Track & Field chief executive Max Siegel; IAAF deputy general secretary and communications director Nick Davies

Track and field

Eugene’s improbable 2019 bid: can it be a winner?

EUGENE, Oregon — It rained, hard, Sunday afternoon. Then, abruptly, it stopped. On Monday, no rain.

Was that random — or, you know, a sign from above that Eugene’s audacious bid for the 2019 track and field world championships is somehow feeling the heavenly love, too? Is this all just cosmic destiny, or what?

Casey Wasserman // photo courtesy Wasserman Media Group

Casey Wasserman // photo courtesy Wasserman Media Group

2024 Bid Cities

LA 2024’s new bid team, many rivers to cross

EUGENE, Oregon — When the four American cities still in the would-be race for the 2024 Summer Olympics head to Colorado Springs, Colorado, for a U.S. Olympic Committee workshop later this week, the Los Angeles bid will have a new face.

Casey Wasserman, 40, one of Southern California’s leading businessmen, has over the past few weeks quietly — in keeping with his style — assumed leadership of the bid.

At a 2014 LA Marathon announcement, in front of the famed peristyle end of the LA Coliseum

At a 2014 LA Marathon announcement, in front of the famed peristyle end of the LA Coliseum

2024 Bid Cities

1932, 1984 — can you say 2024?

Set against the backdrop of International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach’s extensive comments the day before, the U.S. Olympic Committee met Tuesday in Boston as part of its ongoing deliberations regarding the 2024 bid race — and what he had to say, for anyone paying close attention, surely and logically would be shaping the USOC’s direction, if and when it opts to jump in to the 2024 campaign.

1932, 1984 — can you say 2024?

Brian L. Roberts, chairman and CEO of Comcast, and IOC president Thomas Bach, signing the $7.75 billion deal // photo courtesy IOC/Arnaud Meylan

Brian L. Roberts, chairman and CEO of Comcast, and IOC president Thomas Bach, signing the $7.75 billion deal // photo courtesy IOC/Arnaud Meylan

IOC

IOC, NBC bet big together through 2032

The subject first came up last November. This was in New York. It was over dinner at DeGrezia, a small Italian restaurant on East 50th Street that features many private rooms.

The International Olympic Committee president, Thomas Bach, was in town to deliver a major political statement at the United Nations. While in New York, there was time for him — and a couple senior aides — to meet with a few top executives from the IOC’s longtime broadcast partner, NBC Universal. Thus this dinner.

ANOC dignitaries, with Sheikh Ahmad at the center, before Monday's news conference

ANOC dignitaries, with Sheikh Ahmad at the center, before Monday's news conference

IOC

ANOC gets big-time professionalized

KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait — When you are living it in the moment, it is of course a challenge indeed to know whether a three-day meeting spread across a hotel complex and an office tower makes for a turning point, the sort of thing that accounts for the sort of thing Olympic historians can one day point to with distinct accuracy and say, this was when it all came together.

As it drew Monday night to a close, however, it seemed abundantly evident that the time is now for the 204-member Association of National Olympic Committees.