Ben Blankenship of the United States winning the distance medley relay // photo Getty Images and IAAF

Ben Blankenship of the United States winning the distance medley relay // photo Getty Images and IAAF

Track and field

Hey, maybe USATF is building something big!

NASSAU, Bahamas — At a team meeting Friday night, before this second edition of the IAAF World Relays got underway, Dennis Mitchell, one of the American team coaches, urged the U.S. runners to consider that each of them was a hammer and this, these Relays, was a construction project. Use your hammer, he said. Build something big.

That they did.

Usain Bolt running Saturday in the World Relays // photo Getty Images

Usain Bolt running Saturday in the World Relays // photo Getty Images

Track and field

Bolt gets crowd love, a dose of U.S. “respect”

NASSAU, Bahamas — It’s better, as the saying goes, in the Bahamas. They held the first edition of the IAAF World Relays here last year, to resounding success, such success that they resolved to do it all over again.

They needed just one more thing, really, to make the show even bigger and better, the biggest star of them all, the guy who is, more or less track and field in these first years of the 21st century, and when Usain Bolt took the baton and kicked it into gear on the blue Mondo track, you would have thought Thomas A. Robinson Stadium was going to lift off into the moonlit sky.

Uncategorized

Super high-vision: a green bottle with a long neck

When high-definition television came along, it revolutionized the game. Watching sports got way better all over the world for literally millions, if not billions, of viewers.

For fans of American football: think, for instance, of Mario Manningham’s clutch 38-yard catch that sparked the New York Giants’ winning drive in Super Bowl XLVI, and the sideline tap-dance that was part of it. High-def made it all so real.

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On the lookout for shiny Eagles over Hayward

EUGENE, Ore. — The way this is most likely going to end up is that Jeneba Tarmoh and Allyson Felix are going to have a run-off, probably Sunday, the day after the women’s 200 meters, to decide who gets the third and final spot in the 100 meters on the U.S. team that goes to London.

It’s not a done deal, of course. A jillion things could happen between now and then. But that’s the most probable. After all, it was improbable enough to see a dead heat that ended with both runners timed in 11.068 seconds, and more improbable yet that USA Track & Field didn’t have a process in place to resolve this kind of thing.