Tyson Gay, in red, struggles to hand off to Isiah Young at the 2016 Penn Relays // photo courtesy Penn Relays

Tyson Gay, in red, struggles to hand off to Isiah Young at the 2016 Penn Relays // photo courtesy Penn Relays

Track and field

Can’t we all just — lower the volume?

Attention, all you sanctimonious, moralistic, smarter-than-everyone-else know-it-alls who traffic in rumor, half-truth, character assassination and worse when it comes to USA Track & Field, and in particular the effort to win Olympic and world relay medals.

Do yourselves a favor, along with everyone who values civility, dialogue and tolerance: give it a rest.

LA mayor Eric Garcetti at the start of the Feb. 13 Olympic marathon Trials // photo city of LA

LA mayor Eric Garcetti at the start of the Feb. 13 Olympic marathon Trials // photo city of LA

2024 Bid Cities

Poll: 88 percent – 88 percent! – support for LA 2024

In a western democracy such as the United States, it’s hard to get nine out of 10 people to agree on pretty much anything. Is the sky blue? Does the sun rise in the east? Is Donald Trump an idiot?

A poll released Tuesday found that 88 percent of Los Angeles County residents want LA to play host to the 2024 Olympic Games.

Following the sun: the wow factor from the 30th floor, looking west

Following the sun: the wow factor from the 30th floor, looking west

2024 Bid Cities

#Followthesun, and other hot (maybe) takes

— In advance of the publication in the coming days of highly technical planning details, it’s far-more-interesting logo-unveil time in the 2024 Summer Olympic bid game. Paris, for instance, came out a few days ago with a stylized Eiffel Tower. On Tuesday,  Los Angeles unveiled its logo and the tagline, “Follow the sun.”

Reaction: let’s be honest here and admit that logos and slogans rarely play a huge role come voting time, with the exception perhaps of the incredibly on-point Pyeongchang 2018 tag, “New Horizons.”

IOC president Thomas Bach at this week's executive board meetings // photo IOC

IOC president Thomas Bach at this week's executive board meetings // photo IOC

IOC

Where is the joy?

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — To use a favorite saying of Thomas Bach’s, the International Olympic Committee president, the IOC’s policy-making executive board and Bach himself did a great job — over three days of meetings that wrapped up Thursday — of talking the talk.

Amid corruption and doping scandals in, respectively, soccer and track and field, the IOC board and president talked up the import of maintaining — if not restoring — the credibility of international sport.

IOC president Thomas Bach in New York in October with UN secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon // photo IOC

IOC president Thomas Bach in New York in October with UN secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon // photo IOC

2024 Bid Cities

Hamburg vote makes plain Olympic brand crisis

Hamburg’s 2024 Olympic bid went down Sunday to devastating defeat in a referendum, a result that is — no reason to mince words — bad, just very, very bad, for the International Olympic Committee and, especially, IOC president Thomas Bach.

Even with all kinds of external factors weighing on the vote — the Paris attacks, a scandal involving Germany’s winning 2006 World Cup soccer bid, the refugee crisis in Germany and across Europe, and more — the vote marks a sharp repudiation of the IOC’s Agenda 2020 would-be reform plan and, indeed, Bach’s leadership, both substance and style.