The IOC executive board at its Montreux retreat // photo courtesy IOC

The IOC executive board at its Montreux retreat // photo courtesy IOC

IOC

IOC’s signals of change

There are two ways to look at the announcement Saturday from the International Olympic Committee that sports such as skateboarding and sport climbing will put on “performances” at next summer’s Youth Games in Nanjing.

If you are the sort who recognizes that the IOC is and always will be, no matter what, a traditionally minded organization, where change moves at a stately pace, the fact that these sports are being reduced to demonstrations doubtlessly will provoke, yet again, exasperation. It’s 2013, almost 2014. Come on, IOC. Get with the program. Skateboarding, right? And climbing is huge, particularly in Europe.

2013-11-16 16.22.28

Track and field

Awards gala turns to doping talk

MONACO — Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, the Jamaican sprint stars, were named Saturday the IAAF male and female athletes of the year.

To think it would have been anyone else would strain credulity. What, they were going to name Bohdan Bodarenko or Zuzana Hejnova? Only track diehards know he’s a high jumper from Ukraine and she is from the Czech Republic and runs the 400 hurdles. Come on.

The scene Sunday at the IOC "summit" // photo courtesy of IOC/Richard Juillart

The scene Sunday at the IOC "summit" // photo courtesy of IOC/Richard Juillart

IOC

A stealth Olympic summit

The International Olympic Committee held something of a stealth meeting of key power-brokers Sunday at its lakefront headquarters in  Lausanne, Switzerland, a move that illuminates the who’s who and what’s what behind the developing agenda of the recently elected president, Germany’s Thomas Bach.

Bach convened the meeting, not widely publicized beforehand and in an IOC release termed an “Olympic Summit,” to address “the main topics of interest and concern” confronting the movement.

IAAF Centenary Gala Show

Doping

On the WADA presidency

MOSCOW — Consider what just these few weeks have brought:

A massive scandal in Turkey, with revelations of teenagers being doped. A rash of doping cases in Russia. Allegations that West Germany’s government tolerated and covered up a culture of doping among its athletes for decades, and even encouraged it in the 1970s “under the guise of basic research.”