Chinese shoppers walk by a 3D mural outside a Beijing mall -- the Beijing capital, which staged the 2008 Summer Games, now one of three 2022 Winter bid cities // photo Getty Images

Chinese shoppers walk by a 3D mural outside a Beijing mall -- the Beijing capital, which staged the 2008 Summer Games, now one of three 2022 Winter bid cities // photo Getty Images

2022 Bid Cities

A four-nation re-think of the IOC bid process

A city campaigning for the 2010 Winter Games spent, on average, $9.5 million. That would have been in 2003. A city bidding for the 2018 Games averaged $34 million. That was in 2011, just eight years later. Yet approaching four times more.

That’s just one of the many illuminating facts about the Olympic bid process in a far-reaching report released Tuesday as a project linking four prominent western European national Olympic committees. In recent months each — Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Sweden — saw Winter Games bids die before they ever really got started.

IOC president Thomas Bach, flanked by communications director Mark Adams, leaving Wednesday's news conference

IOC president Thomas Bach, flanked by communications director Mark Adams, leaving Wednesday's news conference

IOC

More and more, indisputably Bach’s IOC

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — In 1980, Juan Antonio Samaranch of Spain was elected president of the International Committee. The next year, the IOC held a far-reaching Congress in Baden-Baden, Germany, that set the stage for Samaranch’s visionary — yes, visionary — years in office.

Germany’s Thomas Bach was elected IOC president last September. This December, the IOC will hold an all-members assembly in Monaco to reflect on his far-reaching review and potential reform process, which he has dubbed “Olympic Agenda 2020.” Backstage, the comparisons to Samaranch have already begun, and within the Olympic community those comparisons are assuredly meant to be complimentary.

Almaty 2022 executive board member Andrey Kryukov answering reporters' questions

Almaty 2022 executive board member Andrey Kryukov answering reporters' questions

2022 Bid Cities

Whole lotta love for Oslo in IOC report

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — International Olympic Committee evaluation and working group documents are, it is said, strenuously neutral. The IOC purportedly doesn’t rate or rank cities in campaigns for the Summer or Winter Games.

Yet the 2022 working group report that was issued Monday as the IOC passed the three remaining cities — Oslo, Beijing, Almaty — on to the finalist phase is so transparently obvious. It unequivocally favors Oslo, perhaps merely in a bid to keep it in the race, or maybe more. It is relatively positive about Beijing though it makes plain that distances are profound and a sense of why the Games ought to go there ought to be refined. And it is curiously skeptical about Almaty.

IOC President Thomas Bach announcing the three 2022 candidate cities

IOC President Thomas Bach announcing the three 2022 candidate cities

2022 Bid Cities

$51 billion, and now these three

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — As the Rolling Stones so memorably put it, you can’t always get what you want, and that’s worth keeping in mind as the International Olympic Committee announced Monday that it was passing the only three cities remaining through as finalists for the 2022 Winter Games — Oslo, Beijing and Almaty, Kazakhstan.

The Stones also said you get what you need. Is this, really, what the IOC needs? Just three cities in the entire world want the Winter Games, and only one in western Europe, the IOC’s traditional home — and that one, Oslo, is not yet a solid bet to even make it to the finish line next July?

Justin Gatlin (left) wins the men's 100 in Lausanne over Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers // photo Getty Images

Justin Gatlin (left) wins the men's 100 in Lausanne over Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers // photo Getty Images

Track and field

Not just three dopers — at least four!

Do you believe in redemption, and the power of second chances? Or was what went down Thursday in Lausanne, Switzerland, just the saddest of all possible advertisements for track and field?

Three dopers, all American, went 1-2-3 Thursday in the sport’s glamor event, the men’s 100 meters, at the Lausanne Diamond League event: Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers.