Kendal Williams crossing the finish line to win the men's 100 at the 2014 world juniors // photo Getty Images

Kendal Williams crossing the finish line to win the men's 100 at the 2014 world juniors // photo Getty Images

Track and field

‘Anything is possible’: Williams wins juniors 100

EUGENE, Oregon — Two days ago, after Universal Sports posted onto Twitter a shot of a skinny Usain Bolt racing at the IAAF world junior championships — before a home crowd in Kingston, Jamaica, in 2002 — he told his 3.4 million-plus followers, “Still the greatest moment of my life.”

This from a guy who, of course, has gone on to win six Olympic individual and relay medals as well as eight world titles and who holds the world record in the 200 meters, 19.19 seconds, and the 100, 9.58.

Casey Wasserman // photo courtesy Wasserman Media Group

Casey Wasserman // photo courtesy Wasserman Media Group

2024 Bid Cities

LA 2024′s new bid team, many rivers to cross

EUGENE, Oregon — When the four American cities still in the would-be race for the 2024 Summer Olympics head to Colorado Springs, Colorado, for a U.S. Olympic Committee workshop later this week, the Los Angeles bid will have a new face.

Casey Wasserman, 40, one of Southern California’s leading businessmen, has over the past few weeks quietly — in keeping with his style — assumed leadership of the bid.

Hayward Field, site of the 2014 world juniors

Hayward Field, site of the 2014 world juniors

Track and field

Eugene, beyond the 2014 world juniors?

EUGENE, Oregon — First and foremost, Eugene is not TrackTown USA. That is an excellent bit of marketing. But everything is relative. This is a college town, and as track’s worldwide governing body, the IAAF, comes to the United States for the first time in more than 20 years for a championship of any sort, it must be said, like it or not, this is most appropriately CollegeFootballTown USA.

Anybody who tells you anything else simply picked a bad week to stop sniffing whatever might be in the air by the 7-Eleven at the corner of Franklin and Patterson.

Mario Götze scores the winning goal for Germany in the World Cup final against Argentina // photo Getty Images

Mario Götze scores the winning goal for Germany in the World Cup final against Argentina // photo Getty Images

Soccer

There’s a football model in the US — now, soccer?

OK, soccer freaks. Now that the 2014 FIFA World Cup is over, it’s back to reality.

Like it or not, this is the fact: in the United States, football, Peyton Manning-style, is king. A release issued Wednesday from the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame underscores the truth, and shows just how far the United States has to go before it can truly compete on the international stage with the likes of Germany, winners of soccer’s big prize.

Chinese shoppers walk by a 3D mural outside a Beijing mall -- the Beijing capital, which staged the 2008 Summer Games, now one of three 2022 Winter bid cities // photo Getty Images

Chinese shoppers walk by a 3D mural outside a Beijing mall -- the Beijing capital, which staged the 2008 Summer Games, now one of three 2022 Winter bid cities // photo Getty Images

2022 Bid Cities

A four-nation re-think of the IOC bid process

A city campaigning for the 2010 Winter Games spent, on average, $9.5 million. That would have been in 2003. A city bidding for the 2018 Games averaged $34 million. That was in 2011, just eight years later. Yet approaching four times more.

That’s just one of the many illuminating facts about the Olympic bid process in a far-reaching report released Tuesday as a project linking four prominent western European national Olympic committees. In recent months each — Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Sweden — saw Winter Games bids die before they ever really got started.